Mendr 2.0 App Design

Lead UX Designer (Apr - Nov 2017)


Many of the details of this project are confidential, as they're still in the process of being implemented. Click the link below to visit a password-protected page containing more detailed info, sketches, wireframes, designs, and process. You can request access from me via email.

 

FACEBOOK AD CAMPAIGN

Before conducting any user research, we tested user reaction to different brand messaging through Instagram and Facebook ads. This ended up later having a positive impact user research efforts.

It gave us a rough picture of who our early adopters were. But perhaps more importantly, we gained new cohorts of users to interview and gained valuable insight into how we could improve conversion.

I was the art director, graphic designer, and copywriter of these ads. I managed the campaigns and tracked the results, sharing my findings with the rest of the team.

 
 
 This ad was one of the more successful ones in terms of engagement and click-through rate.

This ad was one of the more successful ones in terms of engagement and click-through rate.

 Part of a flowchart-style conversion funnel tracking the path from ad spend to customer spend.

Part of a flowchart-style conversion funnel tracking the path from ad spend to customer spend.

 
 

User Research + Synthesis

During user interviews, I helped form interview questions, assist interviews, and synthesize results.

After each interview, we summarized, grouped and narrowed our findings. Once our findings were synthesized, we placed notes from interviews into the following observation categories.

  1. Trigger, or "when" the flow of action begins, describing the factor of the event triggering the behavior.
  2. Tasks, or the specific behaviors, answering the "how" and "what."
  3. Context, or the environment surrounding the user, effecting them physically or emotionally.
  4. Feelings & Judgements, or attitudes toward the app as a result of their experience.
  5. Goals, the "why" behind the behavior.
  6. Other factors that aren't easily categorized

Lastly, patterns in user behavior were translated into behavior variables. From here, we had a good mental model of who we were designing for, and what kinds of results they were looking for.

For more on this process, click the link at the top of this page.

 
 
 Grouping user insights based on observations of behavior and context.

Grouping user insights based on observations of behavior and context.

 
 

Interface Redesign

At the start, the goal of the redesign proposal was not to stray too far from the existing app, but to address the only major user needs and goals in a way that could be easily implemented.

Since the redesign was iterative, I started by deconstruction the existing app. I broke the app down into a tree of states and looked for any complexity or redundancy between a user and their goal.

Next I created key path scenarios based on the primary behavior variables from our research.

You can see my process of deconstruction, using app flow diagrams, and the various phases of designs, including sketches, block frames, and detailed final designs by clicking the link at the top of this page.

 
 
UI-Presentation
 
 
 
Mendr_ET_Mockup_Mini.png
 
 

Analytics + KPI + Growth

While not designing, I often discussed marketing with the leadership team, and assisted them in turning Tableau data and translated it actionable metrics such as cohort analyses. 

After reading Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers' 2016 and 2017 Internet Trends reports and "The Lean Startup" by Eric Ries, I had an improved sense for how to tweak our strategies for growth and value. As a result, we re-assessed our value hypothesis and engines for growth, and identified potential pivots.

 
 
20_Analysis.JPG
 
 

Product Design Concepts

During weeks of user analysis and marketing, we had many discussions about wildly different Mendr concepts. All the while I had been saving these ideas in a backlog.

After extensively discussing the lean model of growth, I felt comfortable exploring potential product pivots. Combined with an enlightened sense for who our users were and what they truly wanted, I began to revisit some of these concepts.

I wrote down several product ideas, each different completely from the other, and each addressing a specific user goal. I didn't worry too much about feasibility or implementation, and simply let my imagination take the reigns.

Then I started creating wireframes and clickable prototypes and shared them with the team.

This exercise served to imagine what Mendr could be without constraints, much in the same way AirBnB's did with their 10-star experience exercise.

A clearer version of these concepts can be seen by clicking the link at the top of this page.

 
 
 Images blurred and details redacted for confidentiality reasons.

Images blurred and details redacted for confidentiality reasons.

Wireframe copy.jpg